Friday, June 21, 2019

Young Managers

Is the recent trend to hire younger, mostly inexperienced manages like Aaron Boone, Alex Cora, Mickey Callaway, and Gabe Kapler here to stay? Is it a response to a teams' belief in analytics...the number crunchers dictating decisions and moves moreso than the figurehead at the top of the steps?

I've lumped these four together as they all became first time managers in 2018 and have had roughly a season and a half under their belts. Boone and Cora are winning despite their inexperience. Cora, like the blasé John Farrell, won a world series almost by accident. Callaway simply walked into a house of horrors...but at least Cora and Callaway had coaching experience. Kapler is simply inept and is proving it every day--and he was even a minor league manager back in 2007 (his team finished 14th with a record of 58-81).

I believe managers should be trained in the minor leagues just like players are groomed for The Show. And, I believe there needs to be a larger age gap between the manager and the players. How do you all feel?

n.b. Ted Williams was selected for the card for this post as it's the only manager card I had scanned.



4 comments:

  1. I think younger managing applicants are definitely getting more consideration than ever before. Part of it is probably their openness to analytics, but I think there's also something to be said for youth and how much easier it might be for a younger manager to relate and reach his players. It's definitely shifted this way in the NFL... as young coaches for the Rams and Bears have really turned the NFL coaching carousel upside down.

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    1. You said one of my fears! That the manager needs to relate to his players. The manager needs to lead and guide and teach and mentor. Maybe they can do both but I think it's almost dangerous to want the manager to relate to his players.

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  2. Boone and Cora walked into good situations. Dale Sveum could win with the Yankees or Red Sox. I feel that success is determined a good deal by the amount of talent (or minor league talent) your team has when you are hired. Some guys like Callaway walk into a bad situation with no talent. Same thing with Bo Porter and the Astros before they got a little more minor league talent. Porter tried his hardest, but the team wasn’t quite ready, and they got impatient and fired him. Then Hinch came in and the minor leaguers were ready to step up to the bigs, and now he’s a good manager. Granted both of those guys have managing experience, but they were two guys who got put into 2 different situations for the same team. One has what he needed and has a ring. The other guy was at the start of a rebuild and nobody remembers him.
    Baldelli is keeping the Twins in contention, but again, they have talent. I personally don’t think that hiring rookie managers is a good idea because there are things they could be learning in the minors such as how to relate to different types of players, how to handle a guy in a slump, how to handle a superstars (or hotshot prospects) ego. They need to manage in the minors for a few years to learn things and prove themself and then work in the Majors. You can do that at a young age, but I think experience is a good thing, and these young managers who are doing well are only doing so because of the good talent they inherited.

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    1. Thanks for this. We could probably have won with the Red Sox last year!

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