Monday, March 23, 2020

HOF Ozzie Smith

Ozzie Smith was, for his generation, Derek Jeter. But I actually think he was better than Derek Jeter. If you get a boner for WAR, Smith's was 3.5 WAR higher. 

15 times he was an All-Star
He won a single World Series (1982, much to the then American League Brewers chagrin)
13 time Gold Glove Winner
And he was the NLCS MVP.

His card lists "Padre" for 1981. I think they needed the "s" for all the references to Split Season.

Smith broke in with the Padres, just like Dave Winfield, though in 1978. He left after the 1981 season to go play in St. Louis where he finished his career 15 years later, retiring  in mid-season in 1996. Like Winfield, this card does not feature his full stats since the 82 games he played in 1996 aren't featured here.  (Smith was excluded from 1997's Topps set). 

Smith bafflingly won a Silver Slugger award in 1987 for hitting .303 with 0 home runs. Remind me again of the criteria to win the award? That's right, you can't. Smith's 182 total hits (many singles, 40 doubles, and 4 triples) didn't even lead the league. 

Smith was elected into the Hall of Fame in 2002 on his first ballot with 91.7% of the vote. He was the sole inductee that year.

Thanks for stopping by.

8 comments:

  1. Rafael Palmeiro once was awarded a Silver Slugger for first base even though he only played 28 games there. So yeah. Not sure what my point was.

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    1. Even still... I know exactly what your point was.

      I think.

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  2. Smith won a Silver Slugger Award? Now that's some seriously cool baseball trivia.

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    1. With knowledge comes power and great responsibility. I trust you to use it well.

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  3. The silver slugger is for each position. Hitting .303 as a shortstop probably deserves the award. It's still weird that Ozzie Smith of the .262 career batting average won 1.

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    1. That's a good point about each position needing it. I didn't look it up, but I'm sure there was a more powerful SS that year that hit north of .280.

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  4. One of my all-time favorites. I wonder what it was like being the only guy on the podium at Cooperstown that year.

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