Wednesday, January 6, 2021

1995 Topps CyberStats: John Kruk and Darryl Strawberry

I was really excited to get this CyberStats card that Topps put out for John Kruk; though frankly the design of the card makes it really hard to determine what those crazy cyber stats are as there are no column headers. 

But you have to read the fine print! The stats aren't real! They are "computer-simulated data for games of August 12, 1994 through the scheduled conclusion of the 1994 season". What a crock of horse shit! It's like the modern-day "advanced" stats that "adjust" or "weight" various things for players. Cockamamie. None of that's real. I don't think. 


Anyway, this is a great post-swing shot of Kruk. He looks fairly three-dimensional.  Must be that "spectralight" effect.

Strawberry has one in the set, too, and I got that in 2016 and appear to have show it off in a post. So here that is:




Thanks for stopping by!

6 comments:

  1. Made up stats? Man, that's crossing the line.

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  2. You got it right with the part about the Spectra Light technology on the front giving it the effect.
    As for the simulation, the baseball strike cancelled the games of August 12 through the end of the season. Topps took a computer program and simulated the rest of the games in the ‘94 season (the ones that the strike cancelled), and added the stats they got from the computer sim to the real stats players had in ‘94. In case you were wondering, the Indians beat the Braves in the World Series in the Topps simulation.

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    1. I understand there was a strike...lived through it! But they are still completely fabricated numbers and there was NO world series. Simulations are not real. One of the definitions is "the action of pretending; deception". The only numbers that count that year occurred before the cancellation of the season.

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  3. After yesterday... it was nice to wake to a post with the word "Cockamamie" in in.

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  4. I loved that new fangled Spectralight technology as a kid, and am not ashamed to admit that I still love it just as much today.

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